Vote Fraud

Still more problems with mail-in ballots

5 Aug , 2020  

We have previously posted examples of vote fraud with mail-in ballots and we have discussed how the vast majority of other countries ban mail-in voting. But there are other problems with mail-in ballots. In New York City a large percentage of ballots were invalidated, from 19% in Manhattan to 28% in Brooklyn.

More than a month after New York’s June 23 primary elections, state election officials are still counting votes. In some legislative districts, they haven’t even started counting absentee votes. In the best-case scenario, election officials hope to declare winners by the first Tuesday in August—six weeks after Election Day. It might take a lot longer than that. Election officials in New York City have already invalidated upwards of 100,000 absentee ballots—about one of every five that were mailed in from the five boroughs. And furious candidates are already filing lawsuits charging discrimination and disenfranchisement.

Edward-Isaac Dovere, “The Chaos in New York Is a Warning,” The Atlantic, July 24, 2020.

The Wall Street Journal has a devastating discussion of the problems faced by mail-in voting in New York City.

Across the country, late mail delivery play havoc with mail-in voting.

In Florida, a substantial percentage of mail-in votes are disqualified because either the signature is missing or it doesn’t match. Democrats say that results from simple mistakes. But another explanation is that some people don’t sign the ballot because they don’t want to try to fake someone else’s signature. In other cases, their signatures don’t match because they are fraudulent.

But there’s a downside.

Casting a ballot at home requires voters to take simple steps to prevent fraud, yet a surprising number of them get it wrong. As a result, their ballots are not counted.

In the statewide primary on Aug. 30, several thousand ballots were rejected by county canvassing boards because voters neglected to sign their ballot envelope, or because their signature did not match the one on file. . . .

The Florida Democratic Party and Democratic National Committee have filed suit against Florida, challenging the law that rejects ballots with mismatched signatures. . . .

“Rejection rates for vote-by-mail ballots vary significantly across Florida’s counties, underscoring the arbitrary and standard-less nature of the statewide process,” attorney Mark Herron argued in the Democrats’ federal lawsuit. . . .

Steve Bousquet, “The ballot is in the mail, but will it count?,” Miami Herald, October 5, 2020.

Here is the rate that mail-in votes were rejected by the race of the voter.

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