CPRC in the News: HuffPost, National Post (Canada), The Guardian (UK), Global News (Canada), and more

17 Nov , 2017  

Huffington Post, November 15, 2017

. . . I have been following a similar debate about guns which broke out more than 20 years ago, a.k.a. John Lott versus Everyone Else, and not only does the debate about the role of ‘armed citizens’ seem to be heating up again, given what just happened in Vegas and Sutherland Springs, but it seems to have gone beyond the media venues where the argument usually appears. I am referring to a recent article in, of all places, Scientific American, in which a contributing editor, whose specialty is health reporting, took a trip through Georgia and Alabama to find out whether local residents felt more or less safe because they owned guns.

Her trip began in Kennesaw GA, which grabbed a few headlines back in 1982 when following a brief spike in burglaries, a city ordinance was passed requiring every head of household to own a gun. The following year burglaries dropped back to their usual level (i.e., very few,) but as the author points out, the brief crime increase which provoked the law was unprecedented both before and after the law was passed. And this is precisely the problem with trying to show a direct connection between crime rates and gun access, namely, that there may be other variables which could influence whether crime goes up or goes down, notwithstanding the efforts of many researchers to design a statistical model which takes everything into account.

The gun violence prevention and public health communities can criticize John Lott all they want, but he is willing to do something which nobody in either of those groups has done, namely, raise the issue of guns for protection against crime, which the gun lobby then grabbed and promoted in a big way. What we get in response to this powerful messaging are public health studies which show that less than 1 percent of Americans actually use a gun in self-defense. As if the average person makes his mind up by relying on facts. . . .

Global News (Canada), November 10, 2017

As Prof. John Lott concludes in his 2016 book The War on Guns, background checks don’t reduce violent crime. And, for that matter, the idea that more guns increase crime and fatalities is also a myth, Lott says. . . .

National Post, November 9, 2017

Starting with the New York Times wondering why the United States has so many mass public shootings compared to other countries. Which is an odd question because it doesn’t. As John Lott has noted, many European countries have more killed and wounded per capita in such shootings than the U.S. As do many Third World countries where these things don’t get reported. . . .

The Guardian (UK), November 15, 2017

Dr. John Lott, in his bestseller ‘More Guns, Less Crime,’ speaks about the importance of private firearms ownership in a free, democratic society. Guns may take lives. But they also save lives, as evidenced in the recent Texas church shooting, when a local man armed with a ‘semi-automatic assault rifle’ (there is no such thing, by the way) shot the gunman, thus preventing any further casualties. . . .

Maine Wire, November 10, 2017

Our answer to tragedies must not be to do nothing. Neither should we trample our Constitutional rights. When 92% of all mass shooting take place in gun free zones (according to the Crime Prevention Research Center), the solution is not more gun control, but less.

We hear again and again from gun control advocates that there are only two options: surrender the 2nd Amendment or do nothing.  They are wrong.  We have a third option — one that will actually save lives: repealing the failed anti-gun policies they have put in place around us. . . .

CBS Detroit, November 7, 2017

A Michigan legislative committee has voted to allow people with concealed weapon permits carry guns inside churches, schools and other places now off-limits. . . .

[Senate Majority leader Arlan ] Meekoff said the Crime Prevention Research Center reports more than 98 percent of the mass shootings have occurred in gun free zones.

The Michigan Education Association opposes the legislation saying the only people who should be allowed to carry firearms in public schools are police officers and school security personnel. . . .

Standard Republic, November 8, 2017

Gun-rights advocates say that not only do these gun-carrying civilians prove that an armed populace can help mitigate the death toll of a mass shooter, but could also prevent mass shootings as a whole from happening.

“These killers all say they target places where people normally don’t carry guns,” John Lott, the president of the Crime Prevention Research Center, said. “So concealed-carry acts as a deterrent to these killers and would also stop these shootings from being much worse.” . . .

Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, November 9, 2017

The “More Guns, Less Crime” theory was first proposed by economist John Lott in a 1998 book bearing the same title.

Donohue seemed secure in his conclusion.

“For years, the question has been, is there any public safety benefit to right to carry laws? That is now settled,” the paper’s lead author, John Donohue, told Vice News in its analysis piece on the study . “The answer is no.” . . .

Lott’s website, the Crime Prevention Research Center, has also offered a response to Donohue’s study. . . .

Alabama Today, November 8, 2017

In response to the uncertainty, more Americans across the country have been going out and getting guns. According to a July 2017 study by the Crime Prevention Research Center (CPRC), nearly two million Americans obtained concealed carry permits in 2016, meaning one in every 20 citizens now has a concealed carry permit (CCP).

“All states now allow concealed carry,” CPRC President John Lott Jr. said. “And they are all issuing more permits. Not surprisingly, concealed carry is much more popular in states where permits are relatively inexpensive and easy to obtain.” . . .

The Daily Pennsylvania, November 7, 2017

A handful of students in the Penn Political Union debated gun rights advocate John Lott on Nov. 3 on the topic of gun regulations. Lott, who is a columnist for Fox News, has criticized various media outlets for proposing stricter gun regulation laws in the wake of mass shootings.

The debate, organized by PPU, the Pi Sigma Alpha Honor Society, the Wharton Public Policy Initiative, and the Andrea Mitchell Center for the Study of Democracy, covered the frequency of mass shootings in America, the pros and cons of increasing gun regulation, and the accuracy of statistics on gun control.

A team comprised of College sophomore Noah Baron and College freshmen James Nycz and Rachel Steinig argued for increasing gun control, while Lott argued for the opposing view.  . . .

Lott argued that mass shootings are closely related to drug gangs and that legalizing drug use is a more viable solution. He brought in examples of other countries, such as England, where he said increased gun regulations have led to more gun crime. Much of Lott’s argument involved questioning statistics that support increased regulation.

“It was definitely challenging because it’s tough to call out someone who knows the research so thoroughly,” Baron said. . . .

American Thinker, November 7, 2017

As John R. Lott Jr., president of the Crime Research Prevention Center, wrote in an op-ed in the Chicago Tribune on Tuesday, “Since at least 1950, all but two mass public shootings in America have taken place where general citizens are banned from carrying guns.” This is usually why they are selected as targets, Lott says. . . .

Guns Magazine, November 8, 2017

author and researcher John Lott, founder of the Crime Prevention Research Center, estimated that some 16.5 million people are now currently licensed to carry concealed sidearms in the United States. More than a million of them live in Pennsylvania, and Washington State is home to about 590,000 more. . . .


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *