26 May , 2014

Why we shouldn’t depend on mental health professionals to detect mass killers: Elliot Rodger’s slipping “under the radar” is hardly rare

Frequently in the solution to these mass shootings is to simply spend more money on mental health.

MAJOR GARRETT: . . . Do you believe the legislation the Senate did not pass would have made any difference in this case [the Elliot Rodger’s shooting]?

SENATOR RICHARD BLUMENTHAL: The legislation that failed to pass–it got support from fifty-five senators–would have provided a mental health initiative with more resources, greater ability for the Santa Barbara police to intervene–to use the sheriff’s word–to have professionals trained in diagnosing and detecting this kind of derangement.

, ,

9 Apr , 2014

Screen Shot 2014-04-09 at Wednesday, April 9, 4.34 PM

CPRC in the news at Fox News: “After Fort Hood: Should soldiers be allowed to bear arms on base?”

John Lott’s newest piece at Fox News starts this way:

In debates on gun control, gun opponents usually speculate about what might go wrong. Unfortunately, the current debate over arming soldiers on military bases is no different.

Except for the military police, soldiers on military bases are banned from carrying guns.

, ,

22 Mar , 2014

CPRC’s new op-ed piece in the Pittsburgh Tribune Review: “No more sitting ducks — we must arm our soldiers on their bases”

John Lott’s newest piece was the featured commentary in the Pittsburgh Tribune Review’s Sunday opinion section and it starts this way:

Can mass shootings be stopped or prevented? The Obama administration’s political views prevent it from even considering certain obvious solutions.

On Tuesday the Department of Defense released its report on the Sept.

, , ,

19 Mar , 2014

Department of Defense report on Washington Navy Yard Shooting completely ignores problems with gun-free zones

The Department of Defense report on the September 16th, 2013 Navy Yard shooting focuses on Aaron Alexis’ mental health issues not being discovered before the attack:

At various points during Alexis’ military service and subsequent employment as a cleared contractor — from the background investigation in 2007 to the disturbing behaviors he exhibited in the weeks leading up to the shooting — the review revealed missed opportunities for intervention that, had they been pursued, may have prevented the tragic result at the Washington Navy Yard.

, ,