27 May , 2016

Fox News Opinion

CRPC at Fox News: “Obama just got one giant step closer towards creating a national gun registry”

Hawaii is moving towards putting its list of registered gun owners in the FBI database.  Obviously, the state can only enter this data into the FBI database with the approval of the FBI and the US Department of Justice, both under the control of the Obama administration.  Dr. John Lott’s newest piece at Fox News starts this way:

President Obama is taking a big step towards creating a national gun registry. 

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8 Jan , 2016

National Review Banner

CPRC in the National Review: Obama’s Gun-Control Order is Dictatorial, and it Won’t Work

President of Crime Prevention Research Center, Dr. John R. Lott Jr., has an op-ed piece out discussing Obama’s Gun-Control orders and why they simply will not work. The op-ed starts like this

Today, upset that Congress has refused, in his words, to do “something, anything” to stop gun violence, President Obama released executive actions that bring the country closer to his oft-stated goal of “universal” background checks that cover the private transfer of firearms.

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13 Nov , 2015

Washington Post Banner

CPRC in the Sunday Washington Post: “Maryland’s long-overdue goodbye to ballistic fingerprinting”

John Lott’s op-ed at the Washington Post starts this way:

Ballistic fingerprinting was all the rage 15 years ago. Maryland led the way, setting up a computer database on new guns and the markings they made on bullets. New York soon followed. The days of criminal gun use were supposedly numbered.

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10 Nov , 2015

Fox News Banner

CPRC at Fox News: “Scrapped: Maryland ends bullet ID program after 15 years, $5M and zero cases solved”

John Lott was quoted extensively in a Fox News article about Maryland’s decision to scrap its ballistic fingerprinting system.  Ballistic fingerprinting was just another way of trying to register guns.

State authorities have conceded that the bullet ID program, enacted in 2000, cost $5 million, was plagued by technical problems and did not solve a single crime.

11 Jun , 2015

Bloomberg School of Public Health Logo

Bloomberg’s School of Public Health Cherry Picked Claim that firearm homicides in Connecticut fell 40% because of a gun licensing law

The Bloomberg School of Public Health at Johns Hopkins University put out this press release on a paper by Rudolph, Stuart, Vernick, and Webster:

A 1995 Connecticut law requiring a permit or license – contingent on passing a background check – in order to purchase a handgun was associated with a 40 percent reduction in the state’s firearm-related homicide rate, new research suggests.

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15 Jan , 2014

Screen Shot 2014-01-15 at  Wednesday, January 15, 11.17 AM

Evaluating Mother Jones’ “10 Pro-Gun Myths, Shot Down”

The fact that federal court judges are citing Mother Jones’ claims about guns as evidence, particularly for what is cited, is pretty disappointing. We were recently asked to evaluate Mother Jones’“10 Pro-Gun Myths, Shot Down.” Virtually all these responses were widely available in the literature, but unfortunately Mother Jones neither acknowledges nor addresses this literature.…

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12 Jan , 2014

CPRC in the Philadelphia Inquirer: On why gun control is becoming even more impossible to impose

The op-ed piece in the Inquirer starts this way:

The new year has brought yet more gun-control regulations. President Obama announced new executive orders on background checks. Connecticut citizens stood in long lines to register their guns, and, next door in New York City, registration lists are used to confiscate them.

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2 May , 2013

National Review Banner

Piece on Canada’s National Gun Registry: Canada sank $2.7 billion into a pointless project

John Lott and Gary Mauser have a piece in the National Review on the end of Canada’s long gun registry.

Despite spending a whopping $2.7 billion on creating and running a long-gun registry, Canadians never reaped any benefits from the project. The legislation to end the program finally passed the Parliament on Wednesday.